Baby Blankets Bath and Mealtime Twins Big Brother Big Sister Embroidery Designs
Name Meaning Gifts Big Cousin Shirts Gifts for Dad Gifts For Grandparents Gifts For Mom
Christmas Stockings Gift Baskets Birth Announcements Artwork
Clothing Stuffed Animals Birthday Holiday Gifts Sale Items Lettering Styles
 
Poisonous Plant Dangers Around The Home For Babies, Toddlers, and Children

 

General poisoning notes:

Cut-leaved coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) is native to some parts of Canada and is naturalized in others. A double-flowered form is also used as an ornamental in flower beds and is usually called golden glow. Early circumstantial evidence of poisoning of horses, sheep, and swine can be found. Experiments on sheep and swine have shown that some symptoms of toxicity can occur, although animals generally refuse to eat the unpalatable plants. Animal poisoning by this plant should be considered unlikely (Kingsbury 1964).

References:

Kingsbury, J. M. 1964. Poisonous plants of the United States and Canada. Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA. 626 pp.

Skidmore, L. V., Peterson, N. F. 1932. Observations on the toxicity of golden glow (Rudbeckia laciniata) to swine and other animals. J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc., 34: 655-662.

Nomenclature:

 

Scientific Name: Rudbeckia laciniata L.

Vernacular name(s): cut-leaved coneflower

Scientific family name: Compositae

Vernacular family name: composite

References:

Agriculture Quebec. 1975. Noms des maladies des plantes du Canada/ Names of plant diseases in Canada. , Quebec City, Que., Canada. 288 pp.

Alex, J. F., Cayouette, R., Mulligan, G. A. 1980. Common and botanical names of weeds in Canada/Noms populaire et scientifiques des plantes nuisibles du Canada. Revised. Agric. Can. Publ., Ottawa, Ont., Canada. 132 pp.

Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.

Scoggan, H. J. 1978, 1979. The flora of Canada. Nat. Mus. Nat. Sci. (Ottawa) Publ. Bot. 7(1)-7(4). 1711 pp.

Van Wijk, H. L. 1911. A dictionary of plant names. Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, The Netherlands. 1444 pp.

Victorin, M. 1964. Flore Laurentienne. 2nd ed. Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada. 952 pp.

Geographic Information

 

Alberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
Ontario
Prince Edward Island
Quebec
Saskatchewan

References:

Bailey, L. H., Bailey, E. Z. 1976. Hortus third. Revised. MacMillan, New York, N.Y., USA. 1290 pp.

Boivin, B. 1966, 1967. Énumération des plantes du Canada. Provencheria 6. Nat. Can. (Que.) 93: 253-274; 371-437; 583-646; 989-1063. 94: 131-157; 471-528; 625-655.

Notes on Poisonous plant parts:

Ingesting the aboveground portion of this plant produced symptoms in some animals (Kingsbury 1964).

Toxic parts:

flowers
leaves
stems

References:

 

Kingsbury, J. M. 1964. Poisonous plants of the United States and Canada. Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA. 626 pp.

Toxic plant chemicals:

unknown chemical

References:

Kingsbury, J. M. 1964. Poisonous plants of the United States and Canada. Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA. 626 pp.

Animals/Human Poisoning:

Note: When an animal is listed without additional information, the literature (as of 1993) contained no detailed explanation.

Horses

Sheep

General symptoms of poisoning:

anorexia
depression
incoordination

Notes on poisoning:

Experiments on sheep showed that animals ate the distasteful plant after a period of starvation. Ingesting plant material equal to 3-4% of body weight produced symptoms after 24 h. The primary symptoms were incoordination and listlessness. Respiratory rates increased. Animals returned to normal within 36 h (Kingsbury 1964).

References:

Kingsbury, J. M. 1964. Poisonous plants of the United States and Canada. Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA. 626 pp.

Skidmore, L. V., Peterson, N. F. 1932. Observations on the toxicity of golden glow (Rudbeckia laciniata) to swine and other animals. J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc., 34: 655-662.

Swine

General symptoms of poisoning:

abdominal pains
anorexia
depression
incoordination

Notes on poisoning:

In experiments, swine ate the distaste plant material after a period of starvation. The animals exhibited incoordination, dullness, some signs of abdominal pain, and aimless wandering. The symptoms disappeared within 36 h. Symptoms appeared after ingesting plant material equal to 3-4% of body weight. Symptoms could not be reproduced a second time with further feedings (Kingsbury 1964).

References:

Kingsbury, J. M. 1964. Poisonous plants of the United States and Canada. Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA. 626 pp.

Skidmore, L. V., Peterson, N. F. 1932. Observations on the toxicity of golden glow (Rudbeckia laciniata) to swine and other animals. J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc., 34: 655-662.

 

Information Source: ©Canadian Poisonous Plants Information System, Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility.

Go to Harmful Chemicals Page
Go to Insects Page
Go to Animals Page
 

Home Baby Blankets Clothing Bath & Mealtime Stuffed Animals Artwork    Big Brother Big Sister Holiday Gifts Twins Birthday Testimonials Sale Items About Us Recommend Site Questions/Answers Links Embroidery Designs Contact Us View Shopping Cart T-Shirt Sizing Chart Shipping

© Copyright 2004-2013 Babygiftspersonalized™
If there is an issue regarding your order please email customerservice@babygiftspersonalized.com
To check on the status of your order please email customerservice@babygiftspersonalized.com

6 Buy Baby that is 1-866-289-2229 or 1-832-523-3638 for international inquiries.